A closed door piques our curiosity; an open one welcomes. But masterfully designed timber home doors do much more than lead the way inside—it commands attention. Use these door pictures to spark your creativity.

Designers have long known how high-quality, dramatic timber home doors can not only boost a home’s market value, but also evoke a bygone era and express your personality. Homeowners typically focus their attention on front doors, but we caution not to neglect other passageways to architectural bliss. That’s why we’re covering all the other doors in your home, including interior and garage doors, with special attention to the backdoor because they make just as much of a style statement—inside the home and out. Here’s a guide filled with door pictures of our timber-home favorites.

Exterior Doors

Fancy White and Glass Track Barn Door

Barn Door

On a track or hinged to swing open, barn doors can conceal the largest of openings or permit a sneak peak through transparent panes that filter light. A grid of insulated glass panels mimics a bank of windows—the single-panel variety lends a front-door look. Hardware, including rails and rollers, maintain smooth sliding. While a fresh coat of white or cream-colored paint can rejuvenate a beat-up barn door, nothing says authentic like distressed wood.

Folding Glass Door

Folding Glass Doors

Maximizing light decades before the days of electricity, French doors accentuate beautiful interior and outdoor views. Solid oak, walnut, hickory or ash adds warmth and sophistication while maintaining privacy; insulated glass panels and weather-tight wood increase energy efficiency. A variety of sensible and chic styles include double-paned, beveled and frosted glass doors.

Wooden Brown Dutch Door

Dutch Doors

Reminiscent of simpler times, multipurpose Dutch doors invite sunlight and cool breezes without full exposure to the elements. Their farmhouse functionality once kept animals out of the home; nowadays, the door’s split personality lets you chat with neighbors or safewatch kids. Bolted together, the two sections become a standard door.

Interior Doors

Pocket Door

Pocket Doors

Easy to open and close, pocket doors became popular in Victorian homes at the turn of the 20th century, closing off sitting rooms and dens with large entryways. Space-saving pockets eliminate door swing by sliding into a hidden compartment of an adjacent wall, but because installation requires frame construction and extra space, pocket doors may not be practical in all homes.

Louvred Doors

Louvered Doors

Doors constructed with wooden slats, called louvers, increase air circulation in laundry rooms and closets. False louver doors mimic authentic louvers in design and appearance, but air- and light-tight slats ensure complete privacy. While structurally weak, louver doors evoke Southern charm in plantation-style or quaint country rooms and add drama to verandas, covered porches and private balconies.

Garage Doors

Rustic Carriage Door

Carriage Doors

Authentic carriage doors swing out to open, reflecting their 18th-century function in the original garage for horse and buggy. Modern homeowners don’t have to compromise Old World charm for convenience and automatic operation. Although the style is decidedly traditional, contemporary carriage doors are constructed from weather-tight, durable materials for use far beyond the stable.

Firehouse Door

Firehouse Doors

Glass-front garage doors are a modern way to make the most of daylight. Their simple lines and semi-transparent panels bridge the gap between indoor and outdoor spaces. Typically cased in aluminum alloy, firehouse frames are durable and weather-resistant. Operation is rarely a problem for these lightweight timber home doors, which open and close easily.